Replacing Vacant Lots With Green Spaces Can Ease Depression In Urban Communities

Kids love the gardens, she says. It gives them a way to briefly forget their worries.

“Having access to a bit of nature, having a tree to read under, or, having a safe space like one of our gardens, definitely makes a huge difference on their stress levels,” says Lemos-Otero. “The feedback that we’ve gotten from a lot of young people is that it makes them feel a little lighter.”

Now a group of researchers from Philadelphia have published research that supports her experience. The study, published Friday in JAMA Network Open, found that having access to even small green spaces can reduce symptoms of depression for people who live near them, especially in low-income neighborhoods.

Rhitu Chatterjee, WAMU.org, July 21, 2018

Safest level of alcohol consumption is none, worldwide study shows

To minimize health risks, the optimal amount of alcohol someone should consume is none. That’s the simple, surprising conclusion of a massive study, co-written by 512 researchers from 243 institutions, published Thursday in the prestigious journal the Lancet.

The researchers built a database of more than a thousand alcohol studies and data sources, as well as death and disability records from 195 countries and territories between 1990 and 2016. The goal was to estimate how alcohol affects the risk of 23 health problems. The number that jumped out in the end was zero. Anything more than that was associated with health risks.

Joel Achenbach, Washington Post, August 23, 2108